Korean Sociological Image #89: On Getting Knocked up in South Korea

As in, how many Korean women are pregnant when they walk down the aisle? How many get married after giving birth? How many mothers don’t get married at all? And how have public attitudes to all those groups changed over time? I’ve spent the last two weeks trying to find out. It’s been surprisingly difficult, … Continue reading Korean Sociological Image #89: On Getting Knocked up in South Korea

Revealing the Korean Body Politic, Part 6: What is the REAL reason for the backlash?

(Source: Unknown) Whenever one group suddenly starts competing with another for jobs, there’s going to be a backlash. That’s just human nature. Especially if one group has any real or perceived advantages in that competition. In Korea, the targets are young women, who are exempt from doing two years of military service. They are often … Continue reading Revealing the Korean Body Politic, Part 6: What is the REAL reason for the backlash?

Korean Sociological Image #83: Vintage Contraceptive Pill Commercials

Spending the weekend looking for 8 year-old contraceptive pill commercials, as one does, I ended up finding some adorable 38 year-old ones instead: Take the title dates with a grain of salt: this brief post says that they actually come from 1982, 1976, and 1976 respectively, and the second at least is corroborated by very … Continue reading Korean Sociological Image #83: Vintage Contraceptive Pill Commercials

From the Archives: Bagel Girls, Banking, and Babies!

(Source) …[the character of] Chi-Yong’s mother sees marriage as a way to achieve social advancement and material prosperity, as it was in the Victorian era. These ambitions have come to the forefront in Korea since the 1970s, due to rapid economic development and consequent aspirations to class mobility and consolidation during the last thirty years. … Continue reading From the Archives: Bagel Girls, Banking, and Babies!